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Alzheimer's is a type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms usually develop slowly and get worse over time, becoming severe enough to interfere with daily tasks. Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia. The word dementia describes a set of symptoms that can include memory loss and difficulties with thinking, problem-solving or language. These symptoms occur when the brain is damaged by certain diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. This factsheet describes the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, how it is diagnosed, and the factors that can put someone at risk of developing it. It also describes the treatments and support that are currently available. Alzheimer's disease, named after the doctor who first described it (Alois Alzheimer), is a physical disease that affects the brain. There are more than 520, 000 people in the UK with Alzheimer's disease. During the course of the disease, proteins build up in the brain to form structures called 'plaques' and 'tangles'. This leads to the loss of connections between nerve cells, and eventually to the death of nerve cells and loss of brain tissue. People with Alzheimer's also have a shortage of some important chemicals in their brain. These chemical messengers help to transmit signals around the brain. When there is a shortage of them, the signals are not transmitted as effectively. As discussed below, current treatments for Alzheimer's disease can help boost the levels of chemical messengers in the brain, which can help with some of the symptoms. Alzheimer's is a progressive disease. This means that gradually, over time, more parts of the brain are damaged. As this happens, more symptoms develop. They also become more severe. Symptoms The symptoms of Alzheimer's disease are generally mild to start with, but they get worse over time and start to interfere with daily life. There are some common symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, but it is important to remember that everyone is unique. Two people with Alzheimer's are unlikely to experience the condition in exactly the same way. For most people with Alzheimer's, the earliest symptoms are memory lapses. In particular, they may have difficulty recalling recent events and learning new information. These symptoms occur because the early damage in Alzheimer's is usually to a part of the brain called the hippocampus, which has a central role in day-to-day memory. Memory for life events that happened a long time ago is often unaffected in the early stages of the disease. Memory loss due to Alzheimer's disease increasingly interferes with daily life as the condition progresses. The person may: lose items (eg keys, glasses) around the house struggle to find the right word in a conversation or forget someone's name forget about recent conversations or events get lost in a familiar place or on a familiar journey forget appointments or anniversaries. Although memory difficulties are usually the earliest symptoms of Alzheimer's, someone with the disease will also have – or go on to develop – problems with other aspects of thinking, reasoning, perception or communication. They might have difficulties with: language – struggling to follow a conversation or repeating themselves visuospatial skills – problems judging distance or seeing objects in three dimensions; navigating stairs or parking the car become much harder concentrating, planning or organising – difficulties making decisions, solving problems or carrying out a sequence of tasks (eg cooking a meal) orientation – becoming confused or losing track of the day or date. A person in the earlier stages of Alzheimer's will often have changes in their mood. They may become anxious, irritable or depressed. Many people become withdrawn and lose interest in activities and hobbies.
RHEUMATIC ARTHRITIS CURED AND MIRACULASSELY RA FACTOR TURNED TO NEGATIVE FROM POSITIVE BY AAROGYA SUPERSPECIALITY MODERN HOMOEOPATHIC CLINIC(Computerised) AS MODERN HOMEOPATHY CURE IN COMPLETE, PERMANENT , EASY, SAFE , FAST & COSTEFFECTIVE MODE.
ANOREXIA CURED BY COMPLETE, PERMANENT , EASY, SAFE , FAST & COSTEFFECTIVE PERMANENT MODERN HOMOEOPATHY Anorexia nervosa, often referred to simply as anorexia, [9] is an eating disorder characterized by a low weight, fear of gaining weight, a strong desire to be thin, and food restriction.[1] Many people with anorexia see themselves as overweight even though they are in fact underweight.[1][2] If asked they usually deny they have a problem with low weight.[3] Often they weigh themselves frequently, eat only small amounts, and only eat certain foods. Some will exercise excessively, force themselves to vomit, or use laxatives to produce weight loss. Complications may include osteoporosis, infertility and heart damage, among others.[1] Women will often stop having menstrual periods.[3] The cause is not known. There appear to be some genetic components with identical twins more often affected than non-identical twins.[2] Cultural factors also appear to play a role with societies that value thinness having higher rates of disease.[3] Additionally, it occurs more commonly among those involved in activities that value thinness such as high-level athletics, modelling, and dancing.[3][4] Anorexia often begins following a major life-change or stress-inducing event. The diagnosis requires a significantly low weight. The severity of disease is based on body mass index (BMI) in adults with mild disease having a BMI of greater than 17, moderate a BMI of 16 to 17, severe a BMI of 15 to 16, and extreme a BMI less than 15. In children a BMI for age percentile of less than the 5th percentile is often used. DR ARPIT CHOPRA (MD HOMOEOPATHY) Chief Consultant Homoeopath & Biochemic AAROGYA SUPERSPECIALITY MODERN HOMOEOPATHIC CLINIC(Computerised) website- www.homoeopathycure.com
ANKYLOSIS SPONDYLOSIS CURED BY MODERN HOMEOPATHY IN COMPLETE, PERMANENT , EASY, SAFE , FAST & COSTEFFECTIVE MODE. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a type of arthritis in which there is long term inflammation of the joints of the spine.[2] Typically the joints where the spine joins the pelvis are also affected. Occasionally other joints such as the shoulders or hips are involved. Eye and bowel problems may also occur. Back pain is a characteristic symptom of AS, and it often comes and goes.[2] Stiffness of the affected joints generally worsens over time.[2][4] The cause of ankylosing spondylitis is unknown; however, it is believed to involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors.[2] More than 90% of those affected have a specific human leukocyte antigen known as the HLA-B27 antigen.[5] The underlying mechanism is believed to be autoimmune or autoinflammatory.[6] Diagnosis is typically based on the symptoms with support from medical imaging and blood tests. AS is a type of seronegative spondyloarthropathy, meaning that tests show no presence of rheumatoid factor (RF) antibodies.[2] It is also within a broader category known as axial spondyloarthritis. DR ARPIT CHOPRA (MD HOMOEOPATHY) Chief Consultant Homoeopath & Biochemic AAROGYA SUPERSPECIALITY MODERN HOMOEOPATHIC CLINIC(Computerised) website- www.homoeopathycure.com
APPETITE CURED BY MODERN HOMEOPATHY IN COMPLETE, PERMANENT , EASY, SAFE , FAST & COSTEFFECTIVE MODE. Appetite is the desire to eat food, sometimes due to hunger. Appealing foods can stimulate appetite even when hunger is absent. Appetite exists in all higher life-forms, and serves to regulate adequate energy intake to maintain metabolic needs. It is regulated by a close interplay between the digestive tract, adipose tissue and the brain. Appetite has a relationship with every individual's behavior. Appetitive and consummatory behaviours are the only processes that involve energy intake, whereas all other behaviours affect the release of energy. When stressed, appetite levels may increase and result in an increase of food intake. Decreased desire to eat is termed anorexia, while polyphagia (or "hyperphagia") is increased eating. Dysregulation of appetite contributes to anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, cachexia, overeating, and binge eating disorder. DR ARPIT CHOPRA (MD HOMOEOPATHY) Chief Consultant Homoeopath & Biochemic AAROGYA SUPERSPECIALITY MODERN HOMOEOPATHIC CLINIC(Computerised) website- www.homoeopathycure.com
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